Delaware Gubernatorial Race

Candidate Comparison

 


John Carney (D)

Incumbent

 


Julianne Murray (R)

Attorney

Neither of these candidates responded to the Southern Education Foundation’s formal request for information regarding their education platform. All information for these comparisons was either sourced from the candidates’ websites, or from statements the candidates made in articles cited below.

Bio: John Carney is the 74th Governor of Delaware. Prior to being elected to this position, Governor Carney was Delaware’s at-large member of the U.S. House of Representatives for three terms, from 2011 to 2017. Governor Carney also served as Delaware’s Lieutenant Governor from 2001 to 2009. In this position, he created the Models of Excellence in Education program that allowed schools in Delaware to share best practices. Governor Carney received his undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College and his Master’s in Public Administration (MPA) from the University of Delaware.

Bio: Julianne Murray is an attorney and a Republican candidate for Governor of Delaware. Prior to opening her own private practice, Ms. Murray worked at a law firm and as a judicial extern for Justice Henry duPont Ridgely of the Delaware Supreme Court. Ms. Murray received her Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Management from the University of Arizona. She also holds a law degree from Widener University Delaware Law School. She is running for governor to give Delaware a fresh start.

Main Education Priorities: Per his 2016 education policy proposals, Governor Carney believes that Delaware should make sure all children are prepared to learn as they enter kindergarten, all teachers and students are prepared with the resources needed to teach and learn and all students graduate high school college- and career-ready.

Main Education Priorities: Ms. Murray believes that Delaware’s education system should be teaching children “how to think, not what to think.”

Early Childhood Education: Governor Carney restructured the early childhood education governance and accountability model in Delaware to streamline the state’s early education opportunities. In his 2016 campaign, Governor Carney pledged to create a cabinet-level council to better deliver early childhood education, build stronger connections between early learning and K-12 schools, maintain support for high-quality programs and create more responsive intervention models for young children.

Early Childhood Education: Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate a plan for improving early childhood education in Delaware if Ms. Murray is elected governor.

Equitable K-12 Funding: During his first term, Governor Carney directed more resources to high-needs schools in Delaware. Specifically, Governor Carney worked with the General Assembly to provide an additional $75 million over three years to support students from low-income families and English learners and to close achievement gaps. Governor Carney also established the Office of Innovation and Improvement, which focuses on improving high-need schools across Delaware.

Equitable K-12 Funding: In an interview with Delaware Public Media, Ms. Murray stated that there are two things that concern her related to education funding in Delaware: “high cost and low production,” related to the high per-pupil cost and what she describes as low testing outcomes. She stated that the state needs to look at where dollars are being spent and that the state should allocate more funding to classroom instruction. Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate a plan for making school funding in Delaware more equitable if Ms. Murray is elected governor.

Use of Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) Funds: Governor Carney is giving priority to programs in school districts and charter schools that address internet connectivity for students, social and emotional learning needs, instructional techniques associated with distance learning and equity issues associated with distance learning. Governor Carney has also dedicated some of the GEER funds toward the state’s Opportunity Funding Initiative, which is a program that targets resources to students from low-income families and English Language Learners.

Use of Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) Funds: Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate a plan for spending Delaware’s GEER allocation if Ms. Murray is elected governor.

Private School Choice: Governor Carney’s campaign has not articulated a position on private school choice. As a Member of Congress, Governor Carney voted against a proposal to expand the DC Opportunity Scholarship Choice Program.

Private School Choice: Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate a position on private school choice.

Wraparound Services: Governor Carney’s Opportunity Funding Initiative provides $75 million over three years for new mental health supports and other important services in schools. Additionally, Governor Carney launched a Basic Needs Closet that stocks 45 high-poverty schools in the state with basic necessities including clothing, school supplies and hygiene products.

Wraparound Services: Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate how Ms. Murray plans to improve access to wraparound services if elected governor.

School Police and Student Discipline: In 2018, Governor Carney signed the School Safety and Security Fund, which includes $5 million for a range of school safety-related expenditures. The legislation did not include funding for school resource officers.

School Police and Student Discipline: Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate how Ms. Murray specifically plans to deal with the issues of student discipline and police in schools. In an interview with Delaware Public Media, Ms. Murray said that she thinks defunding police is “ridiculous and dangerous.”

COVID-19, Coronavirus Relief Fund and Distance Learning Infrastructure: Governor Carney believes that schools in Delaware should reopen with a hybrid instructional model in the fall, but is ultimately leaving the decision up to local school districts. Governor Carney has not articulated how Delaware plans to spend the state’s Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) allocation.

COVID-19, Coronavirus Relief Fund and Distance Learning Infrastructure: Ms. Murray believes that Delaware’s economy has been hurt by Governor Carney’s COVID-19 shutdown. She believes the Delaware economy should reopen immediately. In an interview with Delaware Public Media, Ms. Murray said that “the downsides of kids not going back to school creates a ripple effect and…parents are going to be left with situations that are largely unmanageable.” Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate how Ms. Murray would spend the state’s Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) allocation, or how Ms. Murray would deal with COVID-19 and distance learning if she is elected governor.

School District Governance Models: Per his 2016 education policy proposals, Governor Carney believes that the Delaware Department of Education should play more of a supportive role than a regulatory one. Governor Carney believes that local and school-level officials should be the primary decision-makers in education.

School District Governance Models: Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate a position on school district governance models.

Teacher Recruitment and Retention: In his first term, Governor Carney expanded the state’s High Needs Educator Student Loan Payment Program, which offers up to $10,000 in student loan relief for educators in high-need schools and subject areas. Governor Carney also restructured the Delaware Department of Education to increase support for educators.

Teacher Recruitment and Retention: Ms. Murray’s campaign website and widely-publicized statements did not articulate how Ms. Murray would address teacher recruitment and retention if she is elected governor. 

Election 2020

Education Equity on the Ballot

What You Need To Know